Correcting Oklahoma Corrections - Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs Correcting Oklahoma Corrections - Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

Trent England is the David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow at the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, where he previously served as executive vice president. He is also the founder and executive director of Save Our States, which educates Americans about the importance of the Electoral College. Trent is a producer of the feature-length documentary “Safeguard: An Electoral College Story.” Trent has appeared three times on Fox & Friends and is a frequent guest on media programs from coast to coast. He is the author of “Why We Must Defend the Electoral College” and a contributor to "The Heritage Guide to the Constitution" and "One Nation Under Arrest: How Crazy Laws, Rogue Prosecutors, and Activist Judges Threaten Your Liberty." His writing has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Washington Times, Hillsdale College's Imprimis speech digest, and other publications. Trent formerly hosted morning drive-time radio in Oklahoma City and has filled for various radio hosts including Ben Shapiro. He previously served as Executive Vice President of the Freedom Foundation in Olympia, Washington, where he developed and directed the Foundation's constitutional studies and activism programs. Trent was also a Publius Fellow of the Claremont Institute, a candidate for the Washington State House of Representatives and a legal policy analyst at The Heritage Foundation. Trent holds a law degree from The George Mason University School of Law and a bachelor of arts in government from Claremont McKenna College. He lives in Oklahoma City with his wife and their three children.

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

Share:

In today's Oklahoman, Rep. Justin Humphrey writes about his effort to get a $2 per hour raise for prison guards. He makes a case for treating these state employees better. The bottom line for the state, and taxpayers, is that unless these problems are addressed, at some point there will be a successful lawsuit and a federal takeover of Oklahoma prisons. 

The Department of Corrections has a shortage in staff of between 45 percent to 50 percent, and the problem seems to be becoming worse. As a result of the reduced staff, officers are being forced to work longer hours and mandatory overtime. The stress of the job, long hours, and the physical and emotional damage created by these conditions has resulted in two officers and one family member recently taking their own lives. In addition, most of our state prisons are located in remote areas and require long drive times. Late hours resulted in vehicle accidents within the past 24 months ending in three officer fatalities and other vehicle occupants losing their lives.

Of course, the best solution is for Oklahoma to put fewer people in prison, so long as we can accomplish that while keeping crime rates low. Other states have done as much. But those changes take time.

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

Share: