David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

Trent England is the David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow at the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, where he previously served as executive vice president. He is also the founder and executive director of Save Our States, which educates Americans about the importance of the Electoral College. Trent is a producer of the feature-length documentary “Safeguard: An Electoral College Story.” Trent has appeared three times on Fox & Friends and is a frequent guest on media programs from coast to coast. He is the author of “Why We Must Defend the Electoral College” and a contributor to "The Heritage Guide to the Constitution" and "One Nation Under Arrest: How Crazy Laws, Rogue Prosecutors, and Activist Judges Threaten Your Liberty." His writing has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Washington Times, Hillsdale College's Imprimis speech digest, and other publications. Trent formerly hosted morning drive-time radio in Oklahoma City and has filled for various radio hosts including Ben Shapiro. He previously served as Executive Vice President of the Freedom Foundation in Olympia, Washington, where he developed and directed the Foundation's constitutional studies and activism programs. Trent was also a Publius Fellow of the Claremont Institute, a candidate for the Washington State House of Representatives and a legal policy analyst at The Heritage Foundation. Trent holds a law degree from The George Mason University School of Law and a bachelor of arts in government from Claremont McKenna College. He lives in Oklahoma City with his wife and their three children.

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

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On today's show, I mentioned that Oklahoma still gives special powers to unions. This is true in school districts, where state law mandates that districts "shall" recognize and negotiate with unions. It also forces all the teachers or other employees in a bargaining unit to be represented by the union and covered by the union contract. Neither the district or individual teachers have any choice—it's a state mandate.

At least it takes an election to set up a union. (Although why 51% of teachers have the right to bind the other 49% to a particular union and bargaining process is an open question.) But perhaps the worst part of current Oklahoma law is that once a union is set up, it is there forever, unless employees go through a cumbersome process (state law says you can only do it in February) to force another election. 

In this country, elected officials have to stand for periodic reelection. So why don't we require the same accountability from unions? Actually, Oklahoma voters think we should.

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

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