David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

Trent England is the David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow at the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, where he previously served as executive vice president. He is also the founder and executive director of Save Our States, which educates Americans about the importance of the Electoral College. Trent is a producer of the feature-length documentary “Safeguard: An Electoral College Story.” Trent has appeared three times on Fox & Friends and is a frequent guest on media programs from coast to coast. He is the author of “Why We Must Defend the Electoral College” and a contributor to "The Heritage Guide to the Constitution" and "One Nation Under Arrest: How Crazy Laws, Rogue Prosecutors, and Activist Judges Threaten Your Liberty." His writing has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Washington Times, Hillsdale College's Imprimis speech digest, and other publications. Trent formerly hosted morning drive-time radio in Oklahoma City and has filled for various radio hosts including Ben Shapiro. He previously served as Executive Vice President of the Freedom Foundation in Olympia, Washington, where he developed and directed the Foundation's constitutional studies and activism programs. Trent was also a Publius Fellow of the Claremont Institute, a candidate for the Washington State House of Representatives and a legal policy analyst at The Heritage Foundation. Trent holds a law degree from The George Mason University School of Law and a bachelor of arts in government from Claremont McKenna College. He lives in Oklahoma City with his wife and their three children.

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

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The BBC today carries a story about new technology that extracts CO2 from the air.

"British Columbia-based Carbon Engineering has shown that it can extract CO2 in a cost-effective way.

"It has now been boosted by $68m in new investment from Chevron, Occidental and coal giant BHP.

"But climate campaigners are worried...."

Whatever you think about the climate, changes, or causation is irrelevant. The point is this technology could reduce CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. For people who believe that the earth faces catastrophic global warming caused by the greenhouse effect, this is a solution.

So why are they worried? The BBC quotes a spokesman for a climate alarmist group and a climate protester. Both admit what some have long suspected—it isn't about the climate. It's about opposition to the use of fossil fuels and perhaps even energy in general (access to energy is a facet of wealth, after all). According to the protester,

"We have a moral responsibility to reduce our consumption on a large scale. We need to reflect deeply on how we live our lives and whether everyone can have access to the things we have, and fairness, so we can all live a good life."

In other words, he has a vision of what is the good life. He wants to impose that vision on everyone else. That vision does not include modern conveniences like abundant energy. "Climate change" is a convenient threat to help drive public sentiment and public policy in his preferred direction. But the climate is not the issue.

David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow

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